The 1970s Science Fiction Movies Quiz

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About This Quiz

The 1970s was a diverse decade for science fiction movies that gave us dark futures and glorious futuristic visions, grim apocalyptic tales and aliens both friendly and hostile. Are you an expert on sci-fi cinema of the '70s? Take this quiz to see.

In this Steven Spielberg movie, people around the world are affected by messages from visiting aliens, which we eventually communicate with via a five-tone musical sequence.

"Close Encounters of the Third Kind" stars Richard Dreyfuss.

This 1976 movie starred David Bowie as an alien who comes to Earth seeking water for his parched home planet.

"The Man Who Fell to Earth" was Bowie's first film role.

A restless farm boy becomes involved in a galaxy-spanning war in this movie, which spawned what is arguably the biggest film franchise of all time.

The farm boy is Luke Skywalker; the movie is "Star Wars." You might have heard something about it.

Ridley Scott's 1979 movie about a space mining crew that stumbles across a devastatingly lethal creature is well-known for artist H.R. Giger's indelible designs.

"Alien" also spawned a long-running film franchise.

This movie features both a dystopian corporate-controlled future and ultraviolent roller derby.

"Rollerball" was closer to the mark in predicting a corporate-dominated 21st century than in predicting any enduring popularity for roller derby.

In this movie, the fourth of five movies in a series about an Earth where primate evolution took a very different direction, humans enslave apes that eventually revolt under the leadership of an ape named Caesar.

"Conquest of the Planet of the Apes" served loosely as the basis of the 2011 reboot series' "Rise of the Planet of the Apes."

A cop hunts a violent gang after they murder his family in this Australian movie set in a dusty dystopian future where water and fuel are scarce.

"Mad Max" stars Mel Gibson.

Yul Brynner played a robot cowboy run amok in this movie about a malfunctioning theme park.

Brynner's trademark shaved head gave his "Westworld" cowboybot a menacing appearance.

In 1971, one of the strangest Godzilla movies was released, in which Godzilla battles a monster that is the living embodiment of pollution.

"Godzilla vs. Hedorah" was released in the U.S. as "Godzilla vs. the Smog Monster."

In this grim movie, the plankton used to produce food rations for the swollen world population runs out, so human corpses are used to make the food instead (without telling anyone).

"Soylent Green is peeeeeeeeeople!"

Jazz musician Sun Ra is the focus of this surreal movie, in which he colonizes a new planet by transporting fellow black people there via his music. It's a good example of 1970s Afrofuturism.

"Space Is the Place" where Sun Ra wanted to build a new future.

This movie is a remake of one made in 1956 about aliens who replace humans with identical clones devoid of emotion.

The bleak, terrifying ending of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" helps make it one of the best horror/sci-fi movies ever made and certainly one of the best remakes.

Charlton Heston stars in this movie about a man who is the only human immune to a plague that wipes out the rest of humanity. It's a remake of "The Last Man on Earth" and was remade again later as "I Am Legend, " starring Will Smith.

The novel upon which all three movies, including "The Omega Man," were based is called "I Am Legend."

This Disney-produced movie is about psychic siblings whose powers draw the attention of a wealthy villain. The kids turn out to be aliens.

"Escape to Witch Mountain" was remade in 1995 and again in 2009.

A popular 1930s sci-fi/adventure serial served as the inspiration for this spoof aimed at adults, featuring the planet Porno, a villain named Emperor Wang the Perverted and quite a lot of nudity.

Critics claim "Flesh Gordon" is a step above most gratuitous parodies because of its obvious love for the original serials.

Speaking of sci-fi movies for adult audiences, this movie is the very definition of cult classic. It's about a couple who stumble across a cross-dressing mad scientist and his depraved band of oddball associates. Oh, and it's a musical.

If you've never been to a midnight showing of "Rocky Horror," you're missing out. I see you shiver with antici …

If you're over 30 years old in this dystopian sci-fi movie, they kill you to control population and resources. Sorry X-Men fans, it has nothing to do with Wolverine.

If you're a fan of tabletop role-playing games, you might notice that the game "Paranoia" bears a certain resemblance to "Logan's Run."

When this movie was released in 1979, it had been ten years since the TV series it was based on was cancelled. The franchise has boldly gone on to numerous features films and multiple TV series.

"Star Trek: The Motion Picture" starred the cast of the original TV series, cancelled in 1969.

Sean Connery starred in this weird movie that's often the butt of Internet jokes for the strappy red costume he wore. It features a flying stone head spaceship and lots of plot about human evolution in the far future.

Connery plays Zed in "Zardoz."

Stanley Kubrick brought a little of the old ultraviolence to screens with this movie about violent youth and government mind control.

The amount of on-screen violence in "A Clockwork Orange" made it very controversial when it was released.

In 1974, Godzilla battled a robotic double of himself (with a little help from a shaggy monster named King Caesar) in this movie.

Godzilla would clash repeatedly with Mechagodzilla over the decades.

This tense movie about scientists investigating a deadly extraterrestrial virus is based on a Michael Crichton novel.

"The Andromeda Strain" is very faithful to the novel, which has the same title.

This 1978 movie was the first superhero blockbuster. It starred Christopher Reeve as an alien who uses his vast powers to protect Earth.

"Superman" was the first of many movies about the man from Krypton.

A computer becomes self-aware and takes control of the world's nuclear missile arsenal as a way to end all war in this movie.

The idea of a computer ending all war is meant to be scary in "Colossus: the Forbin Project," but maybe it's not such a bad idea.

This movie features a British secret agent on the trail of a stolen space shuttle and is part of a long series of movies about said secret agent.

Many James Bond movies have sci-fi elements, but they're brought to the fore in "Moonraker."

Disney produced this space adventure that features robots named B.O.B. and V.I.N.CENT and creepy faceless androids.

Eventually, every character in the movie gets sucked into "The Black Hole."

Although known more as a horror movie than sci-fi, the villainous Tall Man uses zombified victims as slaves on another planet in this movie, which also involves deadly floating metal spheres.

"Phantasm" is a well-loved horror/sci-fi movie despite being an almost entirely amateur production with a tiny budget.

This contemplative Russian movie is about the psychological effects on scientists studying a mysterious planet from their space station. The 2002 remake stars George Clooney.

"Solaris" is a critically acclaimed movie by director Andrei Tarkovsky.

This movie is George Lucas' first feature film, based on a movie he directed in film school. It's about a dystopian future police state controlled by robots and pharmacology.

Lucas later named LucasArts' audio reproduction company "THX" after "THX 1138."

Episodes of a popular animated series were combined to form the 1977 theatrical release of this movie about a starship built from a World War II ship that sets out across the galaxy.

"Space Battleship Yamato" and the various movies and TV series related to it have an enduring popularity both in Japan and around the world.

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