Quiz: 85% of People Can't Identify What Part of Speech Is Underlined in These Sentences. Can You?
Topics
85% of People Can't Identify What Part of Speech Is Underlined in These Sentences. Can You?
By: Becky
Image: shutterstock

About This Quiz

"Conjunction junction, what's your function ..." If you remember those words, you probably loved watching all of the Schoolhouse Rock videos. If you think you remember them well enough, or if you have since become a fan of Grammar Girl, then this quiz is for you. Let's get started to find out how much you actually remember about the parts of speech.

OK, so there are eight parts of speech in the English language. You surely remember the easiest ones: nouns and verbs. And, you probably remember the ones that modify nouns and verbs, adjectives and adverbs, respectively. But where most of us needed a little Schoolhouse Rock education was with the remaining four parts of speech, namely conjunctions, prepositions, interjections, and pronouns.

The fact is that most of us write with little insight into what these parts of speech do or how they work. Yet (did you see what we just did there?), without a full understanding of what these parts of speech do, using them is difficult. If you not only know what the eight parts of speech are but how to use them, then this is the quiz for you.

We challenge you to identify each part of speech in this quiz.

1.0 of 35
The dog is black and brown.

The word "dog" is a noun. A noun is a person, place, or thing.

2.0 of 35
She wanted a red ball, not a blue ball.

The word "red" is an adjective. An adjective describes a noun.

3.0 of 35
She took all of the cupcakes to school.

The word "cupcakes" is a noun. A noun is a person, place, or thing.

4.0 of 35
The letter I received was from my father.

The word "from" is a preposition. A preposition is a word placed in front of (pre-position) noun or pronoun to form a phrase modifying another word in the sentence.

5.0 of 35
She ran quickly to the store.

The word "quickly" is an adverb. An adverb modifies a verb.

6.0 of 35
Wow! That's a lot of money!

The word "wow" is an interjection. An interjection is used to express emotion and is frequently followed by an exclamation point.

7.0 of 35
The big, brown cow jumped over the moon.

The word "jumped" is a verb. A verb is an action word.

8.0 of 35
She burned herself on the hot stove.

The word "hot" is an adjective. An adjective describes a noun.

9.0 of 35
He wanted to go home, but he had to finish his dinner first.

The word "but" is a conjunction. A conjunction joins words, phrases and clauses.

10.0 of 35
She traveled to Chicago on vacation.

The word "Chicago" is a noun. A noun is a person, place, or thing. As a proper noun, the word "Chicago" must be capitalized.

11.0 of 35
The brown bag was empty.

The word "brown" is an adjective. An adjective describes a noun.

12.0 of 35
She went to the store early in the morning.

The word "she" is a pronoun. A pronoun is a noun used in place of a noun.

13.0 of 35
The tall girl jumped high over the fence.

The word "tall" is an adjective. An adjective describes a noun.

14.0 of 35
The boy ran around the block.

The word "ran" is a verb. A verb is an action word.

15.0 of 35
They took the dog to the vet, because he was sick.

The word "because" is a conjunction. A conjunction is a word that joins words, phrases, or clauses.

16.0 of 35
He decided to go to the party.

The word "he" is a pronoun. A pronoun is used in place of a noun.

17.0 of 35
Hey! That's my car!

The word "hey" is an interjection. An interjection is used to express emotion and is frequently followed by an exclamation point.

18.0 of 35
Australia is the land down under.

The word Australia is a noun. As a proper noun, it is always capitalized.

19.0 of 35
She went to the store, but she forgot to buy milk.

The word "but" is a conjunction. A conjunction is a word that joins words, phrases or clauses.

20.0 of 35
She waited by the tree for her friends to get out of school.

The word "by" is a preposition. A preposition is a word placed in front of (pre-position) noun or pronoun to form a phrase modifying another word in the sentence.

21.0 of 35
The young boy rode his bike to the station, and then he took the train home.

The word "and" is a conjunction. A conjunction joins two words, phrases, or clauses.

22.0 of 35
Oops! I forgot to do my homework!

The word "oops" is an interjection. An interjection is used to express emotion and is frequently followed by an exclamation point.

23.0 of 35
She wanted to go to college, yet she didn't work hard for her grades.

The word "yet" is a conjunction. A conjunction is a word that joins words, phrases or clauses.

24.0 of 35
Since she couldn't go home for the holidays, she celebrated with some friends.

The word "since" is a conjunction. A conjunction joins words, phrases or clauses.

25.0 of 35
They went to the amusement park with their friends.

The word "with" is a preposition. A preposition is a word placed in front of (pre-position) noun or pronoun to form a phrase modifying another word in the sentence.

26.0 of 35
She waited her turn, while all of the other children went home.

The word "while" is a conjunction. A conjunction joins words, phrases, and clauses.

27.0 of 35
She will not get any candy until tomorrow.

The word "until" is a preposition. A preposition is a word placed in front of (pre-position) noun or pronoun to form a phrase modifying another word in the sentence.

28.0 of 35
"Cowabunga dude!" said the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

The word "cowabunga" is an interjection ... although, to be serious. we're not sure if it's actually a word. You should still be able to recognize it as an interjection. An interjection is used to express emotion and is frequently followed by an exclamation point.

29.0 of 35
She asked him several questions about the movie.

The word "about" is a preposition. A preposition is a word placed in front of (pre-position) noun or pronoun to form a phrase modifying another word in the sentence.

30.0 of 35
She was not going to the haunted house, because she doesn't like to be scared.

The word "because" is a conjunction. A conjunction is a word used to join words, phrases or clauses.

31.0 of 35
She told the kids to go wait by the car.

The word "by" is a preposition. A preposition is a word placed in front of (pre-position) noun or pronoun to form a phrase modifying another word in the sentence.

32.0 of 35
Oh dear! I can't find my keys!

The word "oh" is an interjection. An interjection is used to express emotion and is frequently followed by an exclamation point.

33.0 of 35
The big, bad wolf huffed and puffed.

The word "bad" is an adjective. An adjective is a word used to describe a noun.

34.0 of 35
Her curiosity about the book was due more to the theme than the substance.

The word "about" is a preposition. A preposition is a word placed in front of (pre-position) noun or pronoun to form a phrase modifying another word in the sentence.

35.0 of 35
He loved to ride roller coasters, but he was afraid of heights.

The word "but" is a conjunction. A conjunction is a word used to combine words, phrases or clauses.

Receive a hint after watching this short video from our sponsors.
quit
hint:
continue