Are These Bible Verses Real or Fictitious?

Becky

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About This Quiz

Are you a student of the Bible? Do you take pride in remembering Bible verses, but also in understanding what they mean? If so, then this is the quiz for you. Let's find out how much you really know about the Lord's word.

Many of us remember memorizing Bible verses in vacation Bible school and in Sunday school. And, for the most part, many of us still remember enough of what we learned to be able to tell the difference between a true Bible verse and a verse that just sounds like it might be from the Bible. After all, many of the writings from previous centuries sound as if they might actually belong in the Bible. So, here's the challenge: We've compiled a list of 35 verses. Your task is to tell us which of these verses are actually from the Bible and which of them are not.

So, assuming that you not only paid attention in Sunday school, but actually retained that information, a perfect score on this quiz will earn you bragging rights next Sunday in church. If you don't get them all right, we suggest you dust off your Bible and dig back into the word of God.

Let's find out if you can tell which of these verses is the real thing.

"In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth."

This Bible quote comes from Genesis 1:1, from a larger quote about the creation of the heavens and the earth, and all life on it: In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.

"Water, water, everywhere, nor any drop to drink."

Written at the end of the 18th century, this is a line from the Samuel Taylor Coleridge poem, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. In the poem, we're told the story of an ancient mariner whose ship was blown off-course -- but visiting by a bird, an albatross, that the ship's crew viewed as a good omen. But the mariner shot and killed the bird with his crossbow, he was blamed for bringing bad luck to the crew -- in the form of a motionless ship surrounded by salty sea water. The dead albatross was hung about his neck as a sign of his guilt.

"If music be the food of love, play on."

In Shakespeare's play, "Twelfth Night, it's Duke Orsino of Illyria who, frustrated with love (or in his case, infatuation with Olivia), opens Act 1, scene 1, with this merry sentiment. Give him so much love, he's saying, that he loses his appetite for it.

"Love is patient, love is kind."

"Love is patient, love is kind," from 1 Corinthians 13:4–8a, is a favorite bible verse that's often recited at wedding ceremonies performed in the Christian church. The full verse is: It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.

"The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want."

From Psalm 23, this Bible verse continues, saying: The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters. He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name's sake. While we often hear or say it when we're mourning or during difficult times, the sentiment is that God is the one who will keep us safe.

"Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all."

William Shakespeare is often mistakenly credited as the author of the line, "Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all." It's actually from the Alfred Lord Tennyson poem, In Memoriam A.H.H., which he wrote as a requiem for a friend who died suddenly of a stroke.

"He that answereth a matter before he heareth it, it is folly and shame unto him."

"He that answereth a matter before he heareth it, it is folly and shame unto him," which we find in Proverbs 18:13 in the bible, might be modernly stated as, it's foolish to talk before listening.

"Do not go gentle into that good night."

"Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the light." This well-known verse isn't from the Bible -- it's from Dylan Thomas' poem, "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night," which he penned during the death of his father in 1947.

"In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God."

The full context of this Bible verse, from John 1:1, is as follows: In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. 4In him was life; and the life was the light of men. Leading theories suggest that the "Word" in this verse refers to Jesus, who was sent to Earth to share the word of God.

"O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done."

From a larger verse, "O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done, The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won," this quote is from a Walt Whitman poem called, "O Captain! My Captain!" -- and for a generation that grew up seeing Robin Williams teach it to his class in "Dead Poet's Society," it was inspiration. The poem is actually a metaphor, written about the death of President Abraham Lincoln.

"For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life."

"For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life," has been called the most famous biblical verse, and because it hits on the very core of Christianity, it's also known as the "Gospel in a nutshell." From John 3:16, the verse, its message is that anyone who believes in Jesus -- His one and only Son -- will be saved.

"Rose is a rose is a rose is a rose."

"Rose is a rose is a rose is a rose," is not a verse from Shakespeare; he wrote, "a rose by any other name would smell as sweet." Rather, this verse is from the poem, "Sacred Emily," written by Gertrude Stein in 1913.

"Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me."

Psalm 23, which includes the verse, "Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me," may be the best-known psalm in the Book of Psalms, and some call it the best-known chapter of the Old Testament. Its meaning boils down to this: while the human experience will bring you to dark places -- literally and figuratively -- God will lead you through it all.

"I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me."

When he says "I can do all this through him who gives me strength," in Philippians 4:13, Paul is describing how despite hardship, God is on our side. It's been often interpreted that nothing is impossible with God.

"Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest."

"Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest," is a statement of unconditional love from God. It's not that he'll take your work away, but, rather, you're always welcome to turn to Him during times of hardship and burden to restore and refresh your soul.

"Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old Time is still a-flying; And this same flower that smiles today, Tomorrow will be dying."

"Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old Time is still a-flying; And this same flower that smiles today, Tomorrow will be dying," is from the poem, "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time," and written by the English poet Robert Herrick. At its heart, it's a poem about carpe diem, which is Latin for "seizing the day," and implores the reader to make the most of the time you have because life is short.

"I love you without knowing how, or when, or from where."

"I love you without knowing how, or when, or from where," is a line from Sonnet XVII, written by Pablo Neruda and inspired by his wife. It's part of his collection of "One Hundred Love Sonnets."

"I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills."

This is the opening lyric to the poem, "Daffodils," which was written in the early 19th century. Inspired by a walk taken with his sister through Glencoyne Park a few years prior, William Wordsworth is the poet behind this verse.

"He is not here: for he is risen, as he said. Come, see the place where the Lord lay."

In Matthew 28, we hear the story of the crucifixion and rising of the Son of God. The angel tells the women not to be afraid, and that Jesus, who they are looking for, has risen from the dead. "He is not here: for he is risen, as he said. Come, see the place where the Lord lay."

"Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you."

This verse appears twice in the Bible. As written here, in Matthew 7:7, and a parallel passage that's nearly identical, in Luke 11:9-13. "Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you," is telling its reader that prayer is the answer.

"Tread softly because you tread on my dreams."

It's WB Yeats who wrote, "But I, being poor, have only my dreams; I have spread my dreams under your feet;Tread softly, because you tread on my dreams ," in his poem about a man in love, "He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven."

"You are whatever a moon has always meant and whatever a sun will always sing."

"You are whatever a moon has always meant and whatever a sun will always sing" is a verse from the E.E. Cummings’ love poem, "[i carry your heart with me(i carry it in]."

"Thou shalt have no other gods before me."

"Thou shalt have no other gods before me" appears in the bible in two places: Exodus 20:2 and Deuteronomy 5:6. It's one of the 10 commandments, or laws for life, given by God to Moses on Mount Sinai to deliver to the people of Israel.

"To err is human; to forgive, divine."

"To err is human; to forgive, divine," may sound like a Bible verse but it's actually from the poem, "An Essay on Criticism, Part II ," written by Alexander Pope in 1711. Here, Pope is saying we should be like God, and show mercy and forgiveness to those who've sinned.

"A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another."

"A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another," is a Bible verse from the Gospel according to John, in John 13:34. It continues, "By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another."

"The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep. And miles to go before I sleep."

You might recognize it from the Quentin Tarantino film, "Death Proof," but this verse, "The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep," was written by Robert Frost in his poem, "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening."

"Abashed the Devil stood, and felt how awful goodness is, and saw Virtue in her shape how lovely—saw, and pined his loss."

Book IV of John Milton's, "Paradise Lost," begins with a soliloquy by Satan, where we're allowed into the devil's mind. "Abashed the Devil stood, and felt how awful goodness is, and saw Virtue in her shape how lovely—saw, and pined his loss," comes from here -- Satan in the Garden of Eden, envious.

"The caged bird sings with a fearful trill, Of things unknown but longed for still."

"I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" is a coming-of-age autobiography written by poet Maya Angelou -- a book that because of its graphic imagery is banned across many counties in the country. Spoiler: “The caged bird sings with a fearful trill of things unknown but longed for still and his tune is heard on the distant hill for the caged bird sings of freedom.”

"In him was life; and the life was the light of men."

"In him was life; and the life was the light of men," from John 1:4, explains that in the beginning, before there were people or anything else other than God, there was life.

"I should have been a pair of ragged claws, scuttling across the floors of silent seas."

"I should have been a pair of ragged claws, scuttling across the floors of silent seas," is a verse from T.S. Eliot's poem, "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," a poem about a man thinking about his place in the world.

"How do I love thee? Let me count the ways."

"How do I love thee? Let me count the ways," is part of a verse from Sonnet 43, of "Sonnets from the Portuguese," by Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Sonnet 43 is one of the 44 love sonnets she wrote between 1845-1846.

"Set your affection on things above, not on things on the earth."

"Set your affection on things above, not on things on the earth," is part of a verse from Colossians 3:2, instructing believers to focus on spiritual things and life everlasting rather than on the trivial problems and temptations among us on Earth.

"Life is a long preparation for something that never happens."

Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans? Life is a bowl of cherries? A box of chocolates? We like to make a lot of comparisons. This WB Yeats verse, "Life is a long preparation for something that never happens," can be found in "The King's Threshold".

"What I do thou knowest not now; but thou shalt know hereafter."

"Jesus answered and said unto him, 'What I do thou knowest not now; but thou shalt know hereafter,'" when Simon Peter asked of him, "Lord, are you going to wash my feet?" This story of service and being a servant of the Lord is found in John 13:7.

"Glory to God in the highest, and on Earth, peace and goodwill towards men."

When Charlie Brown asks what Christmas is all about in the popular Peanuts animated Christmas TV special, Linus tells him the story of the birth of Christ. You'll find the verse, "And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying, 'Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace and goodwill towards men.'" in Luke 2:14.

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