Can You Match the Medical Issue With the Doctor Who Treats It?

Becky

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About This Quiz

How well do you know medical specialties? Think you can identify them all? Take this quiz to find out just how much you really know about what doctors do.

"Mother, mother, I feel sick. Send for the doctor, quick, quick, quick!" Remember this book? It was written by Remy Charlip and published in 1966. Great read.

Although in the book the little boy's mother called the family doctor, what we would call an Internist or a Family Medicine doctor, she might have been better off calling a surgeon. After all, the little boy was munching on a lot of stuff that he really shouldn't have been. Either way, knowing what doctors do is key to understanding what type of doctor to call when you're sick.

One of the best ways to understand what medical specialties stand for is to understand the origins of the name of each specialty - their names have Greek roots. For instance, the word dermatology stems from the Greek word "derma," which means "skin." Similarly, the word cardiology stems from the Greek word "kardia," which means "heart." Once you get the root words down, you'll be able to identify each of the specialties.

Let's see if you can identify all 35 medical specialties.

Stroke

If you've had a stroke, you'll probably need to see a neurologist. Neurologists are trained to deal with disorders of the nervous system.

Heart attack

A cardiologist will treat you if you have had a heart attack. Cardiologists are specially trained to deal with heart disease and disorders.

Bipolar disorder

A psychiatrist would treat bipolar disorder. Psychiatrists are specially trained to treat mental health diseases and disorders.

Cancer

An oncologist treats cancer. However, certain "smaller" cancers may be treated by the specialist of the system the cancer affects.

Acne

A dermatologist would treat acne. Dermatologists are trained to treat issues of the skin, hair and nails.

Kidney stones

A urologist would treat kidney stones. Urologists are specially trained to treat disorders of the male and female urinary tract.

Inflammatory bowel disease

A gastroenterologist would treat IBD. Gastroenterologists are specially trained to treat diseases and disorders of the gastrointestinal tract.

Sleep apnea

Sleep apnea would be treated by an otorhinolaryngologist. Otorhinolaryngologists are specially trained to deal with issues of the ears, nose, and throat (ENT).

Gunshot

An emergency physician is best equipped to deal with a gunshot wound. Emergency physicians are trained in all areas of emergency medicine.

Cataracts

An ophthalmologist would treat cataracts. Ophthalmologists are specially trained in diseases and disorders of the eye.

Cystic fibrosis

A pulmonologist would treat cystic fibrosis. Pulmonologists are specially trained to treat diseases of the respiratory tract.

Thyroid disorder

You would see an endocrinologist for a thyroid disorder. Endocrinologists are specially trained to deal with diseases and disorders of the endocrine system (glands).

Hemophilia

A hematologist would treat hemophilia. Hematologists are specially trained to deal with diseases and disorders of the blood.

Lupus

An Immunologist would treat lupus. An immunologist is specially trained to treat diseases of the immune system.

Arthritis

Rheumatologists treat arthritis. Rheumatologists are specially trained to treat diseases and disorders of the joints and soft tissues.

Kidney stones

Nephrologists treat kidney stones. A nephrologist may also be called a renal physician. They treat issues with kidneys.

Alzheimer's

A geriatrician would treat Alzheimer's. Geriatricians are specially trained to treat disorders of the elderly.

Broken nose

A plastic surgeon might treat a broken nose. Plastic surgeons are specially trained surgeons who treat cosmetic issues.

Bunions

A podiatrist would treat bunions. Podiatrists are specially trained to treat disorders of the feet and ankles.

Measles

A Pediatrician would treat measles. Pediatricians treat children and childhood diseases and disorders.

Epilepsy

A neurologist would treat epilepsy. Neurologist are specially trained to treat disorders of the nervous system.

High blood pressure

High blood pressure might be treated by a cardiologist. A primary care physician might refer a patient to a cardiologist if standard medications don't work.

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia would be treated by a psychiatrist. Psychiatrists are specially trained to treat mental health diseases and disorders.

Eczema

A dermatologist would treat eczema. A dermatologist treats conditions of the skin, hair and nails.

Urinary tract infection

A urologist might treat a urinary tract infection. Urologists are specially trained to treat problems with the urinary tract system.

Crohn's disease

A proctologist might treat Crohn's disease. Proctologists are specially trained to treat problems with the colon.

Ear infection

An otolaryngologist might treat frequent ear infections. Otolaryngologists are also called ENT doctors or ENTs.

Pinkeye

An ophthalmologist might treat pinkeye. Ophthalmologists are specially trained to treat diseases of the eye.

Tuberculosis

A pulmonologist would treat tuberculosis. Pulmonologists are specially trained to treat disorders and diseases of the respiratory tract.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

A psychiatrist would treat PTSD. Psychiatrists are specially trained mental health providers.

Diabetes

An endocrinologist would treat diabetes. Endocrinologists are specially trained to treat disorders and diseases of the glandular system.

Pregnancy

An obstetrician deals with pregnancy. Obstetricians are often gynecologists.

Anemia

A hematologist would treat anemia. Hematologists treat diseases of the blood.

Gout

Rheumatologists treat gout. Rheumatologists receive special training in the treatment of joints and soft tissue.

Premenstrual Syndrome

See your gynecologist if you have PMS. Gynecologists are trained to deal with issues surrounding the menstrual cycle.

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