Can you match these quotes to the right '80s movie?

Estimated Completion Time
5 min
Can you match these quotes to the right '80s movie?
Image: Embassy Pictures

About This Quiz

Think you're the best when it comes to '80s movies? A lean, mean fighting machine? Prove it. See if you can match these quotes from the most popular movies from the decade of excess.
"I'll be back."
John Rambo, in "First Blood"
Maj. Alan "Dutch" Schaefer, in "Predator"
Rocky Balboa, in "Rocky IV"
The Terminator, in "The Terminator"
You can't help but hear it (or say it) in Arnold Schwarzenegger's accent, can you. We were introduced to Schwarzenegger as The Terminator in 1984, when he was hunting Sarah Connor.

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"Wax on, wax off."
Frank Dux, in "Bloodsport"
Kreese, in "The Karate Kid II"
Mr. Miyagi, in "The Karate Kid"
After a summer of getting beaten up by the local gang of karate-trained hooligans from high school, Daniel LaRusso begs Mr. Miyagi to train him. But instead of starting with foot sweeps and knee strikes, Daniel finds himself doing routine chores around Miyagi's place -- like waxing his classic cars. But little did he know that these chores were his training. Now, remember, "Breathe in through nose, out the mouth. Wax on, wax off. Don't forget to breathe, very important."
Sho'nuff, aka The Shogun of Harlem, in "The Last Dragon"

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"Say 'hello' to my little friend!"
Prince Colwyn, in "Krull"
Elliot Ness, in "The Untouchables"
Dr. Robert Elliott, in "Dressed to Kill"
Tony Montana, in "Scarface"
The original "Scarface" was a 1932 film directed by Howard Hawks. It was Al Pacino who is said to have pushed for a remake, and plays Tony Montana, a Cuban immigrant who becomes a drug kingpin in Miami. The movie was first given an X rating for its violence, which accelerates as Montana makes the fatal mistake of using his own product.

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"Go ahead, make my day."
Harry "Dirty Harry" Callahan, in "Sudden Impact"
Go ahead, make Harry "Dirty Harry" Callahan's day. The quote, whick became a Dirty Harry catchphrase, is from the 1983 film "Sudden Impact."
the Man with No Name, in "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly"
Martin Riggs, in "Lethal Weapon"
Snake Plissken, in "Escape from New York"

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"Nobody puts Baby in a corner."
Buford Uan "Bud" Davis, in "Urban Cowboy"
Johnny Castle, in "Dirty Dancing"
That was the summer of 1963 - when everybody called her Baby, and it didn't occur to her to mind. That was before President Kennedy was shot, before the Beatles came, when she couldn't wait to join the Peace Corps, and she thought she'd never find a guy as great as her dad. That was the summer she went to Kellerman's. There, dance instructor Johnny Castle and Frances "Baby" Houseman meet the night she carries a watermelon up to the staff quarters. And then, at then end, there's the night when Johnny states so matter of factly that, "nobody puts Baby in a corner" -- and they do the lift.
Ren McCormack, in "Footloose"
Ozone (Orlando), in "Breakin'"

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"We're on a mission from God."
Elwood Blues, in "The Blues Brothers"
It's 106 miles to Chicago, we got a full tank of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, it's dark, and we're wearing sunglasses. You know how to respond: Hit it. They'll never get caught. They're on a mission from God. "Joliet" Jake and Elwood Blues, that is. The two, played by John Belishi and Dan Ackroyd, put the band back together to save the Catholic orphanage where they grew up, in the 1980 comedy, "The Blues Brothers."
Joe Friday, in "Dragnet"
Roman Craig, in "The Great Outdoors"
Austin Millbarge, in "Spies Like Us"

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"Inconceivable!"
Darkness, in "Legend"
Gaston, in "Ladyhawke"
King of the Moon, in "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen"
Vizzini, in "The Princess Bride"
"The Princess Bride" introduced us to Inigo Montoya, Fezzik, Miracle Max, Buttercup and Westley aka the Dread Pirate Roberts. And, of course, the Sicilian, Vizzini, who continually uses the exclamation, "Inconceivable!" when he really means "Impossible!" Vizzini, we don't think that word means what you think it means.

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"I feel the need ... the need for speed!"
Brian Flanagan, in "Cocktail"
Joel Goodson, in "Risky Business"
Maverick (and Goose), in "Top Gun"
We could tell you, but then we'd have to kill you. Kidding! It's Pete "Maverick" Mitchell who says this, along with his friend Goose (who joins in on the "need for speed" part).
Vincent Lauria, in "The Color of Money"

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"Roads? Where we're going, we don't need roads."
Bastian, in "The Neverending Story"
Dr. Emmett Brown, in "Back to the Future"
He made a time machine ... out of a Delorean. It's Dr. Emmett Brown who says this to Marty, as he, Marty and Jennifer prepare to go to the future at the end of the Robert Zemeckis-directed film "Back to the Future."
E.T, in "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial"
Marty McFly, in "Back to the Future II"

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"Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in awhile, you could miss it."
Audrey, in "National Lampoon's European Vacation"
Duckie, in "Pretty in Pink"
Ferris, in "Ferris Bueller's Day Off"
How could you possible handle school (or work) on a day like this? This movie is so quotable it's hard to reconcile that director John Hughes wrote the script for "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" in less than a week. Over the years, fans have pieced together that Ferris, Cameron and Sloane's skip day was June 5, 1985. Danke schoen, Ferris.
Lisa, in "Weird Science"

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"I'm not bad, I'm just drawn that way."
Alex Owens, in "Flashdance"
Ariel, in "The Little Mermaid"
Funshine Bear, in "The Care Bears Movie"
Jessica Rabbit, in "Who Framed Roger Rabbit"
It's the femme fatale of animation, Jessica Rabbit (voiced by Kathleen Turner) who says this to Eddie Valiant -- originally in the novel, "Who Censored Roger Rabbit?" -- in "Who Framed Roger Rabbit?" The quote is also nominated as one of the greatest by the American Film Institute's 100 Years... 100 Movie Quotes series.

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"No. I am your father."
Darth Vader, in "Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back"
So many people quote this, and yet so many don't get it quite right. Often, you'll hear, "Luke, I am your father." Close, but not quite. Just after Darth Vader has cut off Luke's hand, he, again, tries to persuade Skywalker to join the Dark Side. And it's here he tells Luke that Obi-Wan never told him what really happened to hia father. Luke, who thinks Vader killed his father, is just as surprised as audiences were to hear that no, it is Darth Vader who is his father. Search your feelings; you know it to be true! Noooooooo!
Ben Obi-Wan Kenobi, in "Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope"
The Emperor, in "Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi"
Prince Valium, in "Spaceballs"

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"I know you are, but what am I?"
Jen, in "The Dark Crystal"
Pee-wee Herman, in "Pee-wee's Big Adventure"
"I know you are, but what am I?! I know you are, but what am I?! I know you are, but what am I?! I know you are, but what am I?! I know you are, but what am I?! ... Infinity!" It's rhetorical and childish, but you can't deny it's funny. "You're crazy! I know you are, but what am I? You're a nerd! I know you are, but what am I?" Oh, and the comic gold that is Pee-wee and Francis.
Sarah Anderson, in "Adventures in Babysitting"
Tony Williams, in "Labrynth"

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"O Captain! My Captain!"
Todd Anderson, in "Dead Poets Society"
The first to stand on his desk and say it as John Keating is collecting his belongings, is Todd Anderson. Then Knox Overstreet. Followed by Pitts, then Meeks, and so on. "Carpe ... Carpe Diem. Seize the day, boys. Make your lives extraordinary."
Pvt. J.T. "Joker" Davis, in "Full Metal Jacket"
Clark Griswold, in "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation"
Del Griffith, in "Planes, Trains, and Automobiles"

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"Be excellent to each other, and party on dudes!”
Abraham Lincoln, in "Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure"
Bill and Ted are late for their final project. Will they fail? Of course not! Their time-traveling guests have a message for everyone: party on, dudes! (Oh, and San Dimas High School football rules!)
Lucian Corsican, in "Cheech & Chong's The Corsican Brothers"
Mike Damone, in "Fast Times at Ridgemont High"
Poindexter, in "Revenge of the Nerds"

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"I'll have what she's having."
Becky, in "Sleepless in Seattle"
Dixie, in "Roxanne"
Estelle Reiner, in "When Harry Met Sally ..."
After Sally schools Harry with a fake orgasm while they lunch at Katz's Delicatessen, it's director Rob Reiner's mother, Estelle, who delivers the line, "I'll have what's she's having." Awkward.
Mikey, in "Look Who's Talking"

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"No. 5 is alive!"
Prince Akeem, in "Coming to America"
Johnny Five, in "Short Circuit"
"No. 5" is a robot built as part of a series of prototypes for the U.S. military's S.A.I.N.T. (Strategic Artificially Intelligent Nuclear Transport) program. He escapes, and, of course everything works out in the end. No. 5 goes on to rename himself Johnny Five -- because "No. 5 is ALIVE!"
Leona, in "Mystic Pizza"
Lisa, in "Weird Science"

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"Can I borrow your underpants for 10 minutes?"
Farmer Ted, in "Sixteen Candles"
Farmer Ted, also known as "The Geek," likes to think of himself as a ladies' man. He borrows Sam's underpants and charges $1 a head to see them in the boys' bathroom, in "Sixteen Candles."
Gordie Lachance, in "Stand by Me"
Jeff Spicoli, in "Fast Times at Ridgemont High"
Ty Webb, in "Caddyshack"

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"These go to 11."
Kira, in "Xanadu"
Nigel Tufnel, in "This is Spinal Tap"
"The numbers all go to 11. Look, right across the board, 11, 11, 11 ..." says Spinal Tap guitarist Nigel Tufnel as he proudly shows off his amps to filmmaker Marty Dibergi in "This Is Spinal Tap." But when Marty asks him why not keep 10 as the top number, but make it louder, Nigel pauses. "These go to 11," he repeats.
Pink's wife, in "Pink Floyd: The Wall"
Seymour Krelborn, in "Little Shop of Horrors"

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"Snap out of it!"
Chelsea Thayer Wayne, in "On Golden Pond"
Doralee Rhodes, in "9 to 5"
Loretta Castorini, in "Moonstruck"
It's probably not the reaction he was expecting, when Ronny Cammareri tells Loretta that he's in love with her. Loretta responds with, "Snap out of it!" -- and slaps him across the face, twice.
Ouiser Boudreaux, in "Steel Magnolias"

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"You have to purify yourself in Lake Minnetonka."
The Kid, in "Purple Rain"
The Kid, in "Purple Rain," doubts Apollonia would pass the initiation -- "to purify yourself in the waters of Lake Minnetonka." Apollonia strips off her clothes, runs toward the lake and jumps in. But, in the end, "That ain't Lake Minnetonka," he says.
Samantha, in "Can't Stop the Music"
Sheila E., in "Krush Groove"
Touchstone, in "Fame"

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"How very."
Bea Arthur, in "History of the World, Part I"
Judy Benjamin, in "Private Benjamin"
Lydia Deetz, in "Beetlejuice"
Veronica Sawyer, in "Heathers"
What's your damage, Heather? Veronica Sawyer is obviously not a Heather, however she's best friends with them. Together, they're the most powerful clique at Westerburg High School, in Sherwood, Ohio -- and "Ronnie" is your most sarcastic friend.

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"It's not the years, honey. It's the mileage."
Roy Neary, in "Close Encounters of the Third Kind"
Han Solo, in "Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi"
Indiana Jones, in "Raiders of the Lost Ark"
Indy says this to Marion Ravenwood, in "Raiders of the Lost Ark," after she comments that he's "not the man [she] knew 10 years ago."
‎Conan the Destroyer, in "Conan the Barbarian"

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"If you build it, he will come."
"Bull Durham"
"Field of Dreams"
Iowa farmer Ray Kinsella keeps hearing a voice in his cornfield; "If you built it, he will come." And the voice is right. After Ray plows a baseball diamond in that cornfield, Shoeless Joe Jackson and the ghosts of other baseball players play there.
"Major League"
"The Natural"

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"All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy."
Elizabeth Solley, in "The Fog"
Garrett Breedlove, in "Terms of Endearment"
Glen Lantz, in "A Nightmare on Elm Street"
Jack Torrance, in "The Shining"
It's not what Wendy Torrance expects to see when she looks at the stacks of single-line typed pages: All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. But then, not much about living at the Overlook Hotel is what you'd expect.

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"So, what would you little maniacs like to do first?"
King Agamemnon, in "Time Bandits"
Jordan Cochran, in "Real Genius"
Lisa, in "Weird Science"
Gary Wallace and Wyatt Donnelly use their computer, a Barbie doll, and a handful of other odds and ends to create their dream woman: Lisa. And when she comes to life, she asks them this very thing.
Spock, in "Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan"

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"Be afraid. Be very afraid."
Pete Fountaine, in "Gremlins"
Jack, in "Friday the 13th"
Pvt. Hudson, in "Aliens"
Veronica "Ronnie" Quaife, in "The Fly"
This highly-quoted line was nominated as one of the greatest film quotes by The American Film Institute's 100 Years... 100 Movie Quotes series. It was first said by Ronnie, to warn Tawny.

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"You're so cool, Brewster."
Countess, in "Once Bitten"
Evil Eddie, in "Fright Night"
Edward "Evil" Thompson doesn't believe there are vampires living next door to Charley Brewster, but he humors him. Evil Ed is later turned into a vampire, branded with a cross on his forehead.
Sam Emerson, in "The Lost Boys"
Spike Nolan, in "Brewster's Millions"

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"When someone asks if you are a god, you say, 'Yes!'"
Arnold "Arnie" Cunningham, in "Christine"
Ashley "Ash" J. Williams, in "Evil Dead II"
Mike Tobacco, in "Killer Klowns from Outer Space"
Winston Zeddemore, in "Ghostbusters"
Do you believe in UFOs, astral projections, mental telepathy, ESP, clairvoyance, spirit photography, telekinetic movement, full trance mediums, the Loch Ness monster and the theory of Atlantis? Perfect. Have we got a job for you. (But remember, don't cross the streams.)

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"I gave her my heart, and she gave me a pen."
Harry Burns, in "When Harry Met Sally ..."
Jack Colton, in "Romancing the Stone"
Jake Ryan, in "Sixteen Candles"
Lloyd Dobler, in "Say Anything"
When Diane Court breaks up with Lloyd Dobler before leaving for her scholarship to study in England, she makes him promise to write. And, she gives him a pen. In the end, it's Diane who does the writing -- to her dad, during his stretch in prison.

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"We'd better get back, 'cause it'll be dark soon, and they mostly come at night ... mostly."
Chucky, in "Child's Play"
Max, in "The Road Warrior"
Newt, in "Aliens"
This is the same scene where Pvt. Hudson delivers the line, "That's it, man. Game over, man." But it's Newt, in "Aliens" who warns Ripley and the Marines about the creatures coming out at night ... mostly.
R.J. MacReady, in "The Thing"

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"So it's sorta social, demented and sad, but social. Right?"
Ronald Miller, in "Can't Buy Me Love"
John Bender, in "The Breakfast Club"
Sitting around the library, Bender, Claire and Brian are talking about clubs -- academic versus other kinds of clubs. In physics club, Brian says, they talk about physics and properties of physics. And that's when Bender delivers this line, "So it's sorta social, demented and sad, but social. Right?"
Jeffrey Willis, in "The Flamingo Kid"
Guido, in "Risky Business"

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"They're heeeere!"
Ben Crandall, in "Explorers"
Carol Anne Freeling, in "Poltergeist"
A kid, a static TV screen and some terrorizing ghosts scared a generation of moviegoers when it hit the big screen in 1982. "Poltergeist" has since been ranked at No. 80 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years ... 100 Thrills list.
Gertie, in "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial"
Pris, in "Blade Runner"

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"Don't call me Shirley."
Dr. Barry Rumack, in "Airplane!"
When Ted Striker says to Dr. Rumack, "Surely you can't be serious," Rumack responds with the now-infamous comeback, "I am serious ... and don't call me Shirley." Comedic gold. Coincidentally, there was a Shirley on the flight, and we see her commenting that she hadn't felt "this awful since we saw that Ronald Reagan film."
Irwin M. "Fletch" Fletcher, in "Fletch"
John Winger, in "Stripes"
Lane Meyer, in "Better Off Dead"

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"There can be only one."
Dar, in "The Beastmaster"
Connor MacLeod, in "Highlander"
Scot Connor MacLeod is immortal and began the battle to be the only one in the Scottish Highlands in 1536. In 1986 New York City, he's still in the battle, fighting to kill the remaining immortals by beheading them.
King Arthur, in "Excalibur"
Alex Rogan, in "The Last Starfighter"

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