Can You Name All of This Electrician Equipment From an Image?

Estimated Completion Time
5 min
Can You Name All of This Electrician Equipment From an Image?
Image: gerenme/E+/gettyimages

About This Quiz

If you're like most people, you probably really like being able to flip on a light switch when you get home to send light flooding through your home. You might enjoy watching TV, browsing the net via WiFi, or losing yourself in a computer or video game. Wondering what these things have in common? They all require a functioning electrical system to keep them running. That means as long as people want to keep enjoying things like lighting and tech, they'll need someone to repair, maintain and replace things like wires, outlets and other devices -- which means plenty of jobs for those up for the challenge!

And that's where you come in. Those with an interest in what keeps the lights on, or how power gets from those wires in the sky to your flat-screen TV, may find that a career as an electrician is just the ticket. Professionals in this field enjoy lots of flexibility, working outside a cubicle and using their hands and their heads to get the job done.

Of course, skill is only half of the equation. Electricians also require a supply of tools to strip and join wires, install conduit and keep systems running as expected. Think you can recognize the most common tools used in this field? Prove  it with this quiz!

Fish Tape Can you name this useful piece of equipment, which electricians use to pull new wires through walls and ceilings?
Fish tape
Fish tape gets its name from the fact that it is used to fish wire through cavities within walls, ceilings on even under raised floors. Often lubricated using a product known as cable lube, it's connected to wire at one end and snaked through the cavity when installing or expanding an electrical system.
Chalk line
Plumb bob
Tape measure

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Linesman Pliers Can you name this nifty nipping tool used when working with wire?
Ratchet
Linesman pliers
Also known as side-cutting pliers, linesman pliers feature an angled cutting blade that is perfect for snipping wire to the desired length. This tool comes in many varieties, but spending a little more can net you pliers with a contoured, ergonomic grip for greater comfort and protection against wrist injuries.
Voltage detector
Reciprocating saw

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Tape measure Almost everyone on a construction site has at least one of these, and electricians are no exception! Can you name this handy tool?
Voltage tester
Hammer
Reaming bit
Tape measure
While all tradesmen need a tape measure, electricians can benefit by looking for units equipped with special features. A magnetic tip makes it easy to make measurements without a helping hand, while a tape that is double-sided is more convenient to read when making measurements above your head.

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Wire stripper Do you know the name of this common wire-prep tool?
Pipe jack
Wire stripper
You can't connect insulated wires without first stripping off the outer coating. While this insulation can be scraped off with a knife, it's much easier to use a wire stripper, which has different sizes of holes to accommodate a variety of wire.
Conduit cart
Drill

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Voltage detector Can you identify this powerful testing tool?
Moisture meter
Stud finder
Voltage detector
Not sure if a circuit is live or not? A good electrician knows that the right way to find out whether current is present is to use a voltage detector rather than risking electric shock by taking your chances. The size of a large pen, this tool tells you instantly whether power is present, no contact required.
Cable feeder

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Needle nose pliers What is this tool, which is used to grasp and manipulate electrical wires, called?
Wrench
Nut-driver
Needle-nose pliers
As you might expect based on their name, needle-nose pliers are pliers with a long skinny point at the tip. In places where your fingers can't reach -- say inside a receptacle or junction box, or inside a crowded panel -- needle-nose pliers make it easy to grab, twist and connect wires with ease.
Wire stripper

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Label maker What is this must-have tool for electrical professionals?
Label maker
Experienced electrical pros know that those who fail to label their work as they go are likely to end up with a tangled mess of mystery wires. A label maker, which prints out neat labels for everything from conduit to breaker panels, belongs in every electrician's toolbox.
Conduit bender
Cable cutter
Wire cart

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Reciprocating saw Planning to do some demo? This power tool can help. Do you know its name?
Miter saw
Reciprocating saw
Unlike many power saws, which feature rotating blades, reciprocating saws use long, skinny blades that rely on a push-pull motion to cut through wood, metal and plastic. This handy power tool is perfect for cutting a pipe or conduit, or even for demoing a wall to reach the wiring tucked inside.
Angle grinder
Drill

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Conduit Bender No, there's no such thing as a pipe stretcher, but can you name this equipment, which electricians use when working with conduit?
Conduit reamer
Conduit bender
Conduit is metal tubing that electricians use to protect wires. When wrapping conduit around a corner or an obstruction, electrical pros use a tool called a conduit bender to create curves or angles in the pipe. This allows for successful, smooth installations, especially in applications where the conduit is visible rather than hidden behind a wall or ceiling.
Conduit cutter
Conduit stripper

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Fish pole Can you name this important electrical tool, which has a name that some people not in the trade might find surprising?
Fish pole
No, you won't be reeling in trout with this tool, but a fish pole can be used to pull wires in a home or construction site. By poking this long tool into a ceiling, raised floor or wall cavity, electricians are able to grab fish tape or wire in places that hands just can't reach.
Cat hoist
Dog stick
Mouse catcher

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Multimeter What is the name of this gadget, which electricians use to test wires and devices on the job?
Measuring tape
Fish tape
Stud finder
Multimeter
A multimeter is a handy gadget for electrical pros. This device looks sort of like a fancy calculator, but is actually designed to test for voltage, current and electrical resistance all in one tool. This allows the electrician to inspect circuits and spot potential issues during installation or repair work.

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Flashlight You never know what you're going to find when you head out to a new job site or home to perform electrical work. Can you name this tool that can help you get the job done?
Flashlight
Electricians are often responsible for setting up temporary power on a new construction site -- which means there might be no light sources at all when you first arrive on the site. A flashlight allows you to see where you're going while you prep for power, and is also useful for seeing inside a dark panel or wall cavity during renovation work.
Level
Hardhat
Label maker

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Cordless drill Almost everyone on a construction site carries one of these tools. Do you know what it's called?
Miter saw
Router
Impact wrench
Cordless drill
A power drill is a must-have for electricians, who use it to remove and replace switch plates, receptacles and equipment. Going cordless means you never have to worry about finding an outlet -- or stretching out an extension cord for others to possibly trip over.

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Wire crimper Can you name this tool used in making electrical connections?
Wire crimper
A loose connection between a pair of wires can create a fault that prevents appliances or fixtures from working -- and can even pose a safety hazard. Wire crimpers solve this problem by forcing a tight, secure connection between the wires that will last long after you've moved onto the next job.
Conduit bender
Pipe jack
Rotation tester

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Safety glasses What is the name of this critical safety equipment that no electrician should ever be without on the job?
Knee pads
Ear plugs
Safety glasses
Sure, safety glasses can be a pain to remember, and may not be exactly comfortable, but if you ever question why you should wear them, Google "safety glasses saved my eyes." You'll find countless pictures of workers--including electricians--whose vision was saved from flying debris, grinding wheels and other hazards thanks to a simple and affordable pair of goggles.
Insulated gloves

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Nut driver Do you know what this versatile hand tool is called?
Nut driver
Think of a nut driver set as a screwdriver set designed for use with nuts and bolts, rather than regular screws. It comes with one shaft and a series of interchangeable bits that can loosen or tighten fasteners in even tough-to-reach places.
Level
Tape measure
Hammer

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Level This tool ensures your work looks as good on the surface as it does inside the electrical panel. Do you know its name?
Multimeter
Level
Almost any tradesman can benefit from the use of a level. Thanks to a series of air bubbles, this tool can tell you if that switch plate or outlet you're about to install is actually straight. It's also useful for leveling light fixtures, equipment and conduit runs.
Reciprocating saw
Rotation tester

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Reaming bit What is this conduit-working tool called?
Roto split
Reaming bit
Electricians use conduit pipes to protect wires, and this conduit must be cut to fit each installation. A reaming bit, or deburring tool, cleans away rough and ragged edges in the conduit so the wires can pass through freely without snagging.
Spade bit
Utility knife

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Hardhat Smart electricians who want to remain smart never work without this piece of equipment. Can you identify it?
Tool belt
Conduit rack
Hardhat
Electricians are exposed to all kinds of hazards on the job. There's the obvious issue of shock or burns, but bumping the head or having an object fall on your head from higher up is also a concern. Invest in a Class B hardhat and wear it every time you work -- this class not only protects from bumps, but also has the highest protection of any hardhat type against burns and high voltage.
Drill

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Screwdriver set Can you identify this tool, which is as much at home in the electrician's tool belt as it is in the work kit of a carpenter or plumber?
Reaming bit
Hammer
Screwdriver set
Screwdriver sets are useful for any tradesman. Electricians who are already weighed down by electrical tools can save space by investing in a screwdriver set with interchangeable bits, which is perfect for everything from screwing in a switch plate to installing straps or racks for conduit.
Reciprocating saw

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Lockout Kit No electrician would work on a big job without this equipment. Do you know what it's called?
Lockout kit
If you power down a piece of equipment to work on an electrical system, it could be disastrous if someone were to power that system back up while you're working. A lockout or lockout/tagout kit allows you to lock down the power and let everyone know you are working on it, no matter where you are in the building or job site.
Reel jack stand
Knee pads
Hole saw kit

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Rotation tester What is the name of this tool used for testing three-phase motors?
Razor knife
Lift
Rotation tester
Electricity in the United States is distributed across the grid using three-phase power -- a technology which is also used in many motors and pieces of equipment used to maintain electrical systems. A rotation tester allows electricians to test items that use this tech, particularly motors and equipment found in big machinery.
Channel locks

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Hole Saw Do you know the name of this cool cutting tool?
Hole saw kit
A hole saw fits onto a standard drill, and can be used to cut a perfect hole with little effort. An electrician's hole saw kit contains standard size saws needed in electrical work to accommodate conduit or recessed light fixtures.
Reciprocating saw
Miter saw
Circular saw

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Knee pads Can you name this tool that can keep you working in the trade even when you're past your prime?
Knee pads
An electrician who skips the knee pads while working on the ground is unlikely to have a long career thanks to knee pain. Because electricians spend a lot of time on the ground wiring receptacles and equipment, a quality pair of knee pads is a solid investment for people in this field.
Hard hat
Hammer
Utility knife

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Receptacle tester Do you know what this pocket-sized gadget is called?
Label maker
Tape measure
Receptacle tester
A receptacle tester looks like a relatively simple device, but it can save a whole lot of time and effort. By simply plugging it into an outlet, an electrician can tell if the outlet works or not, what the problem might be, and if any GFCI feature that is supposed to be in place is actually working or not.
Razor knife

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Conduit rack What is the name of this handy transport tool?
Ladder
Conduit rack
Many electrical codes require wires to be concealed within pipes called conduit to protect them from damage over time. That can mean hundreds or thousands of feet of conduit installation in a large building. Save your strength -- and your back -- by transporting all that piping on a conduit rack with wheels.
Nut driver
Hard hat

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Ear plugs Can you ID this piece of equipment that should be in every electrician's pocket?
Magnetic tray
Nut driver
Multimeter
Ear plugs
Noise levels over 85 decibels can permanently damage your ears over time -- and power saws and other tools used in the electrical field can produce 110 decibels or higher. Keep your ears in top shape by popping in a pair of ear plugs for protection every time you hit the job site.

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Cable feeder This piece of equipment can make quick work of wiring. Do you know its name?
Ladder
Fish pole
Cable feeder
When you're dealing with huge amounts of cable -- say, in a data center -- pulling cables by hand just isn't practical. On those jobs, a cable feeder can be used to quickly distribute cables over racks and trays to get the job done more efficiently.
Conduit bender

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Channel locks Do you know the name of this handy holding tool?
Needle-nose pliers
Channel locks
Channel locks are heavy-duty adjustable pliers that you can lock into place to hold, install or remove nuts and bolts. They are also useful if you need a bit of leverage to remove a difficult fastener or clip.
Hammer
Mallet

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Cut-resistant gloves What is the name of this "handy" safety equipment?
Cut-resistant gloves
Electricians are extremely vulnerable to hand injuries. Beyond the whole high voltage issue, there are sharp edges from broken bulbs, metal junction boxes and equipment, or even tools like razor knives. Stay safe with cut-resistant gloves, and try an insulated pair for additional voltage protection.
Hard hat
Safety glasses
Steel-toed boots

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Magnetic tray There's nothing worse than chasing down a loose screw that's fallen into some hard-to-reach nook. Can you name this tool that helps to minimize this problem?
Wire rack
Magnetic tray
A magnetic tray uses the power of magnetism to hold screws and other fasteners exactly where you put them. Even better, the tray itself will stick to steel, including things like I-beams, panels and many other types of electrical equipment.
Fish tape
Label maker

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Wire cart What is the name of this equipment designed to make electrical installation projects more efficient?
Hammer
Fish pole
Rotation tester
Wire cart
Even a simple electrical project can involve hundreds of feet of wire, which can easily end up in a tangled mess if you aren't careful. Wire carts have arms that stick up to hold rolls of wire, keeping them organized and making them much easier to transport than if you simply tried to carry them.

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Hammer Can you ID this common construction tool?
Hammer
A hammer is such a useful tool that every tradesman should have one -- including electricians. It's the perfect tool for demoing walls or prying out a stubborn nail, and it's also useful for installing things like junction boxes or other equipment.
Finish nailer
Wire crimper
Power drill

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Cable cutter What is the name of this tough tool used in the electrical field?
Wire stripper
Screwdriver set
Cable cutter
Some electrical jobs require heavy cables rather than wire. Cable cutters, which are larger and more heavy-duty than typical linesman pliers, are designed to make quick and easy cuts in cable. For very large cables, invest in a ratcheting cutter, which opens wide to tackle even the toughest materials.
Lift

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Lift Do you know the name of this tool that can help you reach new heights?
Pipe jack stand
Lift
It can be downright dangerous to climb a ladder while carrying a fluorescent light fixture or roll of wire. A simple scissor lift allows you to do work above the ceiling while greatly reducing your risk of a fall.
Wire cart
Channel locks

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Knockout kit Do you know the real name for this equipment, which many electricians casually call a slug buster?
Knockout kit
Feeding conduit into a panel or other equipment requires cutting a hole in a thick sheet of metal. Knockout tools, or slug busters, are designed to pop out perfect disks of metal to make room for the conduit.
Receptacle tester
Conduit rack
Reaming bit

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Roto split What is the name of this tool used when working with armored cable?
Wire stripper
Tape measure
Fish tape
Roto split
Some wires come encased in flexible metal tubes. Known as MC cable or armored cable, this material is very durable -- which makes it tough to cut. A roto split is specifically designed for cutting metal cables to the correct length.

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Infrared temperature gun Do you know the name of this tool used to spot electrical problems?
Infrared temperature gun
An infrared spot temperature gun allows electricians to spot potential problems with ease. Using infrared technology, it alerts the user to overheated systems or equipment, and can help you spot missing insulation or hot spots.
Hole saw kit
Power drill
Wire rack

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Reel jack stand What is the name of this equipment, which is used when working with wire?
Lockout kit
Lift
Reel jack stand
A giant spool of wire is pretty much impossible to unroll by hand. When working with these over-sized spools, a reel jack stand can hold the spool off the ground so that the wire is easier and safer to feed.
Hammer

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Utility Knife Can you ID this tool, which is used by apprentices and master electricians alike?
Utility knife
A utility knife is the jack-of-all-trades tool on a job site. It's ideal for cutting open boxes, creating a hole in drywall or scoring a line to guide a cut. This simple and affordable tool also makes quick work of old paint or caulk that might be preventing you from accessing a panel or other equipment.
Multimeter
Receptacle tester
Knee pads

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