Quiz: How Consumer Reports Automotive Ratings Work

By: Staff

4 Min Quiz

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About This Quiz

Consumer Reports Automotive Ratings are great for car buyers. How knowledgeable are you when it comes to understanding Consumer Reports Automotive Ratings? Take this quiz and find out!

True or False? Consumer Reports looks at many different car models and reports separately on models with different engines or trim lines.

Consumer Reports looks at many different car models and reports separately on models with different engines or trim lines

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True or False? Consumer Reports works independently from automakers.

Consumer Reports works independently from automakers, so it doesn't need to worry about losing advertising sales for giving a vehicle a poor rating.

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True or False? Consumer Reports interprets its findings and reports them back to automakers.

Consumer Reports interprets its findings without having to report them back to automakers. It reports all the data it collects, not just the data it collects on the cars with the best results.

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True or False? Consumer Reports follows J.D. Power's survey taking methods.

Unlike J.D. Power's survey based on the first 90 days of ownership and its Vehicle Dependability studies which track 3-year-old vehicles, the Consumer Reports survey asks for subscribers' opinions about their cars over the course of the last 12 months.

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True or False? Consumer Reports ranks cars using two methods.

Consumer Reports ranks cars using two methods: First, it sends out surveys to ask consumers about the overall performance of their vehicles. Second, it checks this data against its own tests, which are conducted on a test track.

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True or False? Consumer Reports annually collects data from telephone surveys.

Consumer Reports annually collects its data from a questionnaire that is mailed to subscribers of both its Web site and its magazine. In 2009, the survey was sent to 7 million subscribers, and 1.4 million responses were received [source: Consumer Reports]. The survey is created by a staff of social scientists who also consult with automotive engineers and statisticians at the Consumer Reviews' national research center.

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True or False? The Consumer Report National Testing and Research Center, located in Yonkers, N.Y., is the largest nonprofit education and consumer product test center in the world.

The Consumer Report National Testing and Research Center, located in Yonkers, N.Y., is the largest nonprofit education and consumer product test center in the world. Additionally, the Consumer Reports Test Track, located in Connecticut, is recognized as one of the best facilities for automotive testing in the world. The 327-acre site is one of the largest for automotive evaluation [source: Murray].

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True or false? Consumer Reports requires a minimum sample size of 50 cars to publish auto reliability information; however, most models have much larger samples numbering into the thousands.

Consumer Reports requires a minimum sample size of 100 cars to publish auto reliability information; however, most models have much larger samples numbering into the thousands. Because of the minimum requirement of 100 cars for a sample, Consumer Reports can't publish information on every model of car. Despite this, they're reporting usually matches well with car sale trends.

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True or False? You can obtain a full Consumer Report for your potential automobile by subscribing to either the organization's Web site or magazine.

You can obtain a full Consumer Report for your potential automobile by subscribing to either the organization's Web site or magazine. A subscription to the Web site costs $26 per year [source: Consumer Reports]. When you go to the Consumer Reports Web site, you can access a list of vehicle models that have been evaluated by consumers.

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True or False? You have to be a member of Consumer Report to glean information for the site.

You don't have to be a member to glean information from the site, however. Although you need to be a paying subscriber to get a full model report, you can get an indication of the cars' performance based on a checklist system on the Web site.

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