Quiz: Culinary term or military term?
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Culinary term or military term?
By: Staff
Image: refer to hsw

About This Quiz

There are times that the culinary and military worlds collide. Soldiers do have to eat, of course. Can you figure out which of these words you'd use in a kitchen, a mess hall -- or the trenches?

1.0 of 10

Sounds like it could be some sort of European weapon, but it's actually the French word for "zabaglione," an Italian custard.

2.0 of 10
Blood chit?

This could be a good name for some gory part of a cow, but the Department of Defense says it's "a small sheet of material depicting an American flag and a statement in several languages to the effect that anyone assisting the bearer to safety will be rewarded."

3.0 of 10
Maconochie?

Both. This was a thin turnip soup that British troops choked down in the trenches during World War I. Yum.

4.0 of 10
Exfiltration?

You could make a case for this being a fancy way to purify coffee, but it's really the term for the clandestine removal of troops from an enemy area.

5.0 of 10
Allumette?

An Army lantern? No -- it's an hors d'oeuvre made from stuffed puff pastry strips.

6.0 of 10

This is a popular Japanese snack -- but don't you think it could be the name of a game that bored Navy seamen played during World War II?

7.0 of 10
Hardtack?

This is a fine example of when the culinary and the military combine to produce a true delicacy -- a hard biscuit made of flour and water. Very popular during the Civil War ... not so much nowadays.

8.0 of 10
Midcourse phase?

It sounds like it could be a brief rest between dinner courses, but it's actually a military term having to do with the flight of a ballistic missile.

9.0 of 10

An exotic Scandinavian shellfish, perhaps? Nope, it's a crane on a military boat.

10.0 of 10
Turbinado?

A massive aircraft carrier engine -- or raw sugar? Sugar.

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