Do You Remember These TV Catchphrases of the '50s and '60s?

ENTERTAINMENT

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J. Reinoehl

6 Min Quiz

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About This Quiz

Television shows from the ‘50s and ‘60s aren’t called classics for nothing. They had classic style, classic charm, and classic catchphrases worth repeating. Do you know these catchphrases from shows that ran during the ‘50s and ‘60s? Find out by taking this quiz.

On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "All we want are the facts, ma’am”?

“This is the city: Los Angeles. I work here. I’m a cop.” – Sgt. Joe Friday, Dragnet (1951-1959)

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Warning, Will Robinson”?

The spacecraft for "Lost in Space" cost more than building the Starship Enterprise. The final bill was $350,000 (now $2.6 million) but unlike the Enterprise, the audience got to see all the rooms of the Jupiter 2.

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "To the moon, Alice”?

“I forgot that you’re a woman? How could I? You’re always yapping.” – Ralph Kramden, The Honeymooners (1955-1956)

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Beam us up, Scotty”?

The original "Star Trek" competed against "Lost in Space" for two years, and actually received poorer ratings. This may be because "Star Trek" targeted an older audience.

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "I’d like to do a short pantomime now…”?

“…I mean how do you spell Kadiddlehopper?” “Wrong every time.” – L. W. Treadway (Dean Martin) and Clem Kadiddlehopper (Red Skelton), The Red Skelton Show (1951-1971)

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Finish the catchphrase from "Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In": "_________ it to me.”

Lorne Michaels was a writer for "Laugh-In." He later went on to write for "Saturday Night Live."

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "[Title character], you got some ‘splainin’ to do”?

“How do you spell ‘sperience?” “E-x-p—“ “E-x-? You’re kidding.” – Ricky and Lucy Ricardo, I Love Lucy (1951-1957)

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Book ‘em, Danno”?

The Ventures covered the theme song for "Hawaii Five-0," and it made it to #4 on the charts.

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Finish the catchphrase from "The Andy Griffith Show": "Nip it in the _________

“I couldn’t give him the [sobriety] test last night… He was too drunk.” -- Barney Fife, The Andy Griffith Show (1960-1968)

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Come on down”?

"The Price Is Right" is the longest running game show in television history. Currently in its 46th season, it has given away over $250 million in cash and prizes.

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "[Title character] your mother and I are very disappointed in you”?

“Do you think all parents have this much trouble?” “No, just parents with children.” – June and Ward Cleaver, Leave It to Beaver (1957-1963)

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Good night and good luck”?

Edward R. Murrow became famous reporting on World War II. Since he had been working with Fred Friendly on the radio show, "Hear It Now," when he was approached to do a weekly television program, they called it "See It Now."

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "I know nothing”?

[answering the phone using a fake German accent] “I’m sorry; you’ve got the wrong number. [pause] So what if you haven’t told me who you’re calling, yet? No matter who you’re calling, it’s still the wrong number because I don’t even have a phone!” – Carter, Hogan’s Heroes (1965-1971)

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Finish the catchphrase from Get Smart: “Missed it by __________

The network wanted Mel Brooks to write a dog into the show and so Agent K-13 was added, but he wasn’t your typical fluffy pet. The dog was so difficult and costly to work with they wrote him out in the second season.

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "To the Batcave”?

“That orange color. Doesn’t that mean uranium?” “Right on the nose, Robin." – Robin and Batman, Batman (1966-1968)

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "How sweet it is”?

"The Jackie Gleason Show" originally ran a skit of "The Honeymooners." When they turned "The Honeymooners" into a series, actress Pert Kelton (who had played Alice) was dropped because she had been found guilty of communism by association with her husband.

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Mom always liked you best”?

“But what could the president do to make people want to stay in this country?” “Well, he could quit.” – Dick and Tom Smothers, The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour (1967-1970)

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Say goodnight, [title character]”?

"The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show" began on the radio. It was among only a handful of shows to successfully transition to television.

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Yabba dabba doo”?

"Sometimes I just don’t know what’s the matter with men.” “That’s easy—you women!” – Betty and Barney Rubble, The Flintstones (1960-1966)

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Finish the catchphrase from "The Ed Sullivan Show": "We’ve got a _________

Although many talk show hosts are known for their charming personalities, Ed Sullivan was just the opposite. He warmed his way into America’s heart from 1948-1971 as an awkward host notorious for not smiling and bungling introductions and monologues.

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "You rang?”

“The L stands for Lucifer.” “Very appropriate for a politician.” – Gomez and Morticia Addams, The Addams' Family (1964-1966)

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Wunnerful, wunnerful”?

"The Lawrence Welk Show" was one of many to suffer from the purge that occurred at the beginning of the 1970s. The FCC had implemented a rule that forced companies to use one hour of local programming during prime time. The big name studios gave up this hour by eliminating popular shows that appealed to older adults in favor of shows that targeted a younger audience.

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Hi-ho, Silver, away”?

“Only you, Tonto, know I’m alive. To the world, I’ll be buried here beside my brother and my friends… forever.” – The Lone Ranger (1949-1957)

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Here’s Johnny”?

Bob Hope appeared more times on "The Tonight Show" in the ‘70s and ‘80s than anyone else. However, Richard Zoglin (author of Hope: Entertainer of the Century) reports that Carson frequently grew tired of Hope, who could book a spot on the show whenever he wanted, who only used scripted jokes and did not interact well, and who frequently brought in highlight clips that were longer than what they normally used.

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Finish the catchphrase from The Adventures of Superman: "Don’t call me _________

“This is a job for Superman… I mean I’ve got to go find him!” – Clark Kent, The Adventures of Superman (1952-1958)

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "What’s up, Doc?”

A rumor circulated for years that Mel Blanc (who did Bugs Bunny’s voice) was allergic to carrots and would spit them out during recording. Blanc gave the real reason for spitting out the carrots in his autobiography when he explained that he would have had to take a break from recording if he had finished chewing and swallowed them.

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Yes, Master”?

“How are things going?” “Terrible. I have to make dinner—I mean actually make it without magic. We are liable to die.” – Jeannie, I Dream of Jeannie

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Jeepers, Mr. Wilson”?

"Dennis the Menace" was based on Hank Ketcham’s son, Dennis. Sadly, but perhaps not surprisingly, Dennis and Hank had an estranged relationship for most of their lives.

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Oh, goody”?

“Herman tried to build a ship inside a bottle. We had to break the bottle to get him out.” – Lily Munster, the Munsters (1964-1966)

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Finish the catchphrase from "Mission: Impossible": "This tape will self-destruct in _________

All the place names were modified so they were not real. Although the show took place in locations around the world, they never filmed outside of the greater Los Angeles area.

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "I gotta kill that boy…”?

“I’m happy because I’ve just fallen in love an hour ago. This is the happiest part of a love affair, just after falling in love and just before the problem of money comes up.” – Dobie Gillis, The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis (1959-1963)

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "It’s just like my Aunt Agnes used to say…”?

The story is similar to Carl Reiner’s life at the time: He was a comedy writer living in New Rochelle with his wife and child. He worked with Mel Brooks (a joke writer) and Selma Diamond (a woman in search of a man).

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Surprise, surprise, surprise”?

“Pyle! My old grandmother could do better than that.” “Well, bless her heart.” – Sgt. Carter and Gomer Pyle, Gomer Pyle, U. S. M. C. (1964-1969)

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On which show could you hear the catchphrase, "Say, kids, what time is it?”

The word “kow-a-bong-a” was first invented on "The Howdy Doody Show." Chief Thunderthud stated it as a nonsense word, but it became a part of popular culture and is now spelled “cowabunga.”

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Finish the catchphrase from "McHale’s Navy": "I could just _________

“What happened? Did somebody spike your corn flakes?” – Capt. Binghamton, McHale’s Army (1962-1966)

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