The Ultimate Judicial System Quiz

Estimated Completion Time
1 min
How are federal judges chosen?
by special elections
by presidential appointments
Federal judges are appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate. These judges generally hold the office for life -- until they die, retire or resign.
by congressional hearings

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A principle ruling or law established during a court case is called what?
precedent
Many federal court rulings become precedent and are generally accepted by other courts dealing with similar cases. When subsequent courts uphold the previous ruling, it is known as stare decisis or "let the decision stand."
primary ruling
habeas corpus

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Which court cannot be abolished?
appeals court
special court
Supreme Court
Congress has the power to create and abolish any federal court except the Supreme Court -- the most powerful court in the United States.

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About how many cases does the Supreme Court hear each year?
100 to 150
Although the Supreme Court receives thousands of requests for cases each year, it only hears 100 to 150 of them. Most of the cases that reach the Supreme Court are on appeal from lower courts.
300 to 350
500 to 1,000

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How many judges are on the Supreme Court?
six
eight
nine
The Judiciary Act of 1789 first established the Supreme Court with six judges. The number of justices on the Court has changed a few times since then, but has remained at nine judges since 1869.

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What action gave the Supreme Court considerably more power by enabling it to declare acts unconstitutional?
constitutionality
judicial review
Chief Justice John Marshall established the concept of judicial review in the 1803 case of Marbury v. Madison. This decision declared that "a legislative act contrary to the Constitution is not law" and that it is "the duty of the judicial department to say what the law is."
due process

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When the Supreme Court grants a request to hear a case, they issue what?
voir dire
habeas corpus
writ of certiorari
If an appellant loses his or her case in Appeals Court, he or she can petition for a writ of certiorari. The Supreme Court isn't required to hear the case, but usually will if multiple courts have interpreted the law differently or if the case presents an issue relating to an important legal principle or the interpretation of the Constitution.

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What are the trial courts of the federal system called?
District Courts
One step below the Court of Appeals is the District Court. These courts hear criminal cases concerning federal offenses and civil cases dealing with matters of federal law or disputes between citizens of different states.
Regional Courts
Federal Trial Courts

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Where do grand juries indict the accused?
in criminal cases
in District Courts
District Courts are the only federal courts where grand juries indict the accused and juries decide the cases.
in Judge Judy's court

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What court would you attend to argue a traffic ticket?
tennis court
special jurisdiction court
Along with traffic-related cases, special jurisdiction courts also hear juvenile cases and lesser civil and criminal cases
general jurisdiction court

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You Got:
/10
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