Quiz: Racehorse or Type of Rose?

By: Maria Trimarchi

Quiz: Racehorse or Type of Rose?
Image: The AGE/Fairfax Media/Getty Images

About This Quiz

At first glance, it might seem that “Knock Out” is the name of a racehorse, however as any gardening aficionado is sure to know that it’s a popular, hardy family of roses. Other than their beauty, it seems that roses and horses have little, if anything in common. However, they both tend to sport unusual, even outlandish monikers (ARRRRR the racehorse, anyone?)

Roses, along with all types of flowers, are bequeathed two types of names upon discovery/creation -- a Latin name and a common name. The Latin name might seem like gibberish to many people; however, the terms selected often describe specific traits of the given flower. While the Latin name is universal, the common name can vary by region, so a rose that’s named one thing in the U.S. might be totally different elsewhere. Roses are often, but not always, named after people of influence or royalty. The club isn’t as exclusive as you might think, however. In fact, new breeds of rose are being cultivated and hybridized all the time, so it’s entirely possible to track one down and commission a rose to be named after a special someone, or even yourself!

Naming a racehorse requires the owner to jump through some different types of hurdles. The Jockey Club manages the approval process for all names, and tries to make the process as seamless as possible by providing an online searchable directory of currently used names, as well as a list of names that have been recently released for use. There are a bunch of guidelines to choosing a horse name, so sometimes a “the weirder the better” philosophy is actually beneficial. Some of the rules are that you can’t name a horse after a living person without permission (First Lady Barbara Bush famously granted hers), or after a deceased person without approval of a written explanation. The name also can’t sound too much like another horse’s name, or be composed entirely of numbers, among other specifications.

Think you know your roses from your horses? Take this quiz and find out!

Tipsy Imperial Concubine
racehorse
rose
This rose bush is known for its heavy fragrance and large, light pink blooms, as well as its funny name.

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Pomponella Fairy Tale
racehorse
rose
Pomponella Fairy Tale is an gold medal-winning bush that blooms pom-pom (pompon) shaped roses.

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Regret
racehorse
Regret won the Saratoga Special, Sanford Stakes and Hopeful Stakes in her first season and went on to become the first filly to win the Kentucky Derby.
rose

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Lavender Pinocchio
racehorse
rose
Lavender Pinocchio roses are mauve and fragrant and bloom in late spring or early summer.

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Eric
racehorse
The winner of the Belmont Stakes in 1889 was a horse named Eric. Yup, just Eric.
rose

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Zenyatta
racehorse
Named after the album "Zenyatta Mondatta" by the Police, this Thoroughbred champion is the winner of the 2009 Breeders’ Cup Classic at Santa Anita and horse of the year in 2010. There is a life-size statue of her in Santa Anita, California.
rose

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Zenaitta
racehorse
rose
Zenaitta is a shrub that blooms clusters of red roses with white centers in the spring, summer and autumn.

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American Pharoah
racehorse
American Pharoah is an American Thoroughbred. In 2015 he was the first to win the grand slam of horse racing, which means he won the Triple Crown plus the Breeders' Cup Classic.
rose

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All ____ are descended from Darley Arabian, Godolphin Arabian and Byerley Turk.
Thoroughbred racehorses
All Thoroughbred stallions, the breed known for racing, are descended from these horses.
heirloom roses

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Alister Stella Gray
racehorse
rose
The fragrant Alister Stella Gray, dating back to 1894, is a climbing rose that peaks in the autumn.

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Barbra Streisand
racehorse
rose
Streisand is said to have tested candidate bushes in her personal garden before choosing a highly fragrant lavender hybrid tea rose as her namesake.

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Man o' War
racehorse
Man o’ War made his racing debut at Belmont Park in 1919. His stellar racing career included three world records, two American records and seven track records.
rose

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Danza
racehorse
When the name "Tony Micelli" was denied by the Jockey Club, Eclipse Thoroughbred Partners, owners of the horse, went with Danza — yes, named for Tony.
rose

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Mrs. Lovell Swisher
racehorse
rose
This hybrid tea rose bush blooms its pink, fragrant flowers more than once throughout the season.

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Boston
racehorse
Boston was America's first great racehorse, before Secretariat, Seabiscuit and Man o' War. Although you'd assume he was named for the city, he's not. Boston is named for a card game.
rose

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Wicked Strong
racehorse
Wicked Strong was originally named Moyne Spun but after the Boston Marathon bombings was renamed "Wicked Strong," since "Boston Strong" was already taken.
rose

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Champneys Pink Cluster
racehorse
rose
This Southern antique noisette rose, dating back to the early 19th century, was almost lost to history but was reidentified in the 1970s.

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Archduke Charles
racehorse
rose
The Archduke Charles, an old China rose, blooms red roses in midsummer.

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War Admiral
racehorse
This American Thoroughbred is perhaps best known as horse of the year in 1937, the same year he won the Triple Crown, Belmont Stakes, Preakness Stakes and the Kentucky Derby. In 1938 he raced against Seabiscuit in the "match race of the century."
rose

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Manipur Magic
racehorse
rose
The Manipur Magic is a tall climbing plant that loves the sun and warm climates. It blooms with large, light yellow roses.

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Chrysler Imperial
racehorse
rose
The Chrysler Imperial, aside from being the name of a car, is a hybrid tea rose bush that blooms very fragrant, dark red roses.

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Raise a Native
racehorse
Raise a Native won both the Great American Stakes and the Belmont Juvenile in 1963. In 1988 The New York Times wrote in his obituary that he was "the most influential sire of American Thoroughbred stallions over the last 20 years."
rose

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Sunbonnet Sue
racehorse
rose
Sunbonnet Sue is a Buck rosebush with yellow blooms in the late spring. Since it blooms only on new wood, it's important to prune this variety.

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California Chrome
racehorse
California Chrome is an American Thoroughbred. This stallion won the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes and was named the American horse of the year in 2014. In 2016 he won the Dubai World Cup and became the all-time leading U.S.-based horse in earnings won.
rose

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Uncle Sigh
racehorse
Uncle Sigh, intentionally spelled wrong, is a Thoroughbred named after Uncle Si from "Duck Dynasty."
rose

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Crown Princess Margareta
racehorse
rose
The Crown Princess Margareta is a tall Austin English rosebush that blooms fruity-scented apricot-orange flowers.

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Soroptimist International
racehorse
rose
The Soroptimist International is a miniature rose that's well-suited for patio container gardens. Its blooms are pink and yellow and abundant.

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Leonatus
racehorse
In 1883 this winning stallion, celebrating his Kentucky Derby victory, ate the presentation roses.
rose

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Zephirine Drouhin
racehorse
rose
The Zephirine Drouhin rose is a thornless climbing Bourbon variety with large, dark pink blooms.

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Rachel Alexandra
racehorse
Rachel Alexandra was the first filly to win the Preakness Stakes in 85 years. She was named horse of the year in 2009.
rose

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You Got:
/30
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